I Love the Dirt at the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve

My love for dirt started at a young age.

When I was two my parents moved from the paved environment of the Bay Area to the rural lands of Boise, Idaho. An acre of dirt made their eyes grow large, much like a kid at a candy store. Yet unfortunately too much candy can cause a bellyache. Finding the balance between raising a family, working 9 to 5, and managing a plot of dirt was tricky; Something had to give. Luckily the strong bonds that had developed (from what I assume is child birth and breast feeding) could not be broken.
They decided dirt had to go. My family moved into a less “dirt-y” environment: Suburbia.

And despite the move my family still loved dirt. Whenever there was extra money burning in our pockets we spent it on dirt. We became weekend dirt warriors. For as many weekends as possible we eagerly traipsed on dirt for family events & relaxation. The dirt around Stanley, McCall, & Cascade, Idaho became our home away from home.

Even the annual family vacations became dirt-focused. During one of my favorite vacations we explored the dirt between Boise, Idaho & deep British Columbia. There we discovered that Canadians harbor a well-kept secret; their abundance of beautiful dirt.
They call their dirt the Canadian Rockies.

As an adult I still love dirt.

For example, when I was living in Girdwood, Alaska I kept pet worms.  Sometimes people would blindly say, “Your pet worms are more boring than a hibernating turtle.”

My response? “I love dirt.”  Plain & simple.

Here are a couple of links to a few of my favorite dirt adventures:

Yum Yum Colostrum:  A Volunteer Experience at Coonridge Orginic Goat Dairy

Atlanta, Idaho Bicycle Journey

Highwway 26 the Bicycle Tour from Boise, ID to Portland, OR

One of the (many) reasons I live at the Bridge Street Inn is for its bountiful, beautiful dirt. In front of the Inn there’s a white picket fence not to keep in the 2 1/2 kids, control the growing herbs or fence in the dog but to keep out the pavement.

Just three blocks from the BSI are some winding dirt trails that lead to the edge of North America’s western shore.  It’s a great opportunity to see the blooming milk thistle or listen to the birds chirp.

Cambria, California has an amazing section of dirt to explore called the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve.

440 acres of WONDERFUL dirt to explore.

Hopefully the photos below will inspire you to come visit this amazing area.

Our dirt will be waiting for you!

Cambria has plenty of areas to explore by foot. This photo blog will focus on the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve.

From the BSI you are a few foot steps away from starting your Cambria dirt adventure. Take Main Street to the Pedestrian Bridge.

The Pedestrian Bridge is easy to find with land mark signs like Chinese Food and Black Cat Cafe.

Your dirt adventure begins here. The Pedestrian Footbridge takes you into East Fiscalini Ranch Preserve.

Follow the trail west through this beautiful meadow.

Cross the footbridge up onto the Pacific Coast Highway.

Looking back at the East Fiscalini Ranch Preserve.

Walk around the gate and towards the sign in the background. You have now entered East Fiscalini Ranch Reserve.

At the Santa Rosa Creek Trail sign  take the trail on the right and walk along Santa Rosa Creek or take the trail shown in the photo up onto the East Fiscalini Ranch Preserve ridge.

On the Santa Rosa Creek Sign is a detailed map of the trail system.

Endangered Monterey Pine Forest

Trails heading south along the ridge meander through an endangered Monterey Pine Forest.

Views of the Santa Lucia Mountains

The Santa Lucia Mountain range runs 105 miles from Monterey southeast for 105 miles to San Luis Obispo.  The highest summet is Junipero Serra Peak, 5, 853 ft.
- Wikipedia

The Ridge

The 400 ft ridge, affords stunning views of the coast to Piedras Blancas to the north and almost as far as Harmony Headlands State Park to the south.
- Cambria Magazine

The Bluff Trail

Intern Emily enjoys the views along the mile long Bluff Trail boardwalk.

Unique benches made by the hands of local Cambrians offer dirt worshippers a place to rest.

Signs explain the natural wonders of the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve

The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary extends all the way to Cambria.

Wildlife

Santa Rosa Creek offers migrating species a wildlife corridor that is not in competition with highway-speed traffic. The result is an amazing display of nature’s diversity including a number of endangered species and species of special concern. Red-legged frogs, tidewater gobies, western pond turtles, steelhead, monarch butterflies, great blue herons, burrowing owls, and Cooper’s hawks are ranch residents along with the compact cobweb thistle and the SLO County dwarf morning glory. Coyotes, black-tailed deer, and the occasional bobcat pass under the highway bridge to the western slope in search of dry season springs and forage.
- Friends of the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve

Love

A relationship built on the values of the Fiscalini Ranch Reserve, the inspiration created from beautiful dirt, and a well kept outhouse are the ingredients for a healthy relationship.  This couples love should endure like a properly constructed adobe brick.

Learn about the history of the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve:
http://www.cambriacsd.org/cm/parks-rec/fiscalini_ranch/Home.html

Overview of the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve:
http://ffrpcambria.org/About_the_Ranch.html

Help maintain the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve:
http://ffrpcambria.org/Join_Now___Donate.html

Help protect Cambria dirt by supporting GreenSpace:
http://greenspacecambria.org/home_menu.htm

One response to “I Love the Dirt at the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve

  1. Pingback: I Love the Dirt at the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve | Earthworm Envy

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